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Except to say that’s some real uncontextualized bs right there. Where, exactly and in relation to a hurricane’s path, is the air drier after the storm passes? Get your head out of you Meteorology 101 textbook, gather up your humidity measurement devise and go find me some place in the path of the storm that’s drier after if passes. What drivel.

5 Responses

  1. “Where, exactly and in relation to a hurricane’s path, is the air drier after the storm passes? ”

    Well…
    You must admit that the air must be a bit drier if buckets of water are no longer falling from the sky…!

    Although…one could ask…drier that what? the air before? the air during?

    1. SueK– Here is the standard thinking. A storm comes through, sweeps all of the moisture out of the air and it’s dry, and probably cooler. My thinking before my first hurricane as well. And it’s correct for frontal systems.

      What folks don’t understand is that it is freaking HOT after a hurricane. And sunny, too. Thus that water that fell, especially if the ground is saturated, goes back into the air. It’s almost always humid as all get out. And then there are the mosquitoes.

  2. Heh.
    Before, the article indicated that there were no responses although I had responded with one reply. Now the article says there are 2 replies, and I only find the single one I entered to start with.

    Computers. Hmmpf.

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